Faculty

Derek Wilson GroupDerek Wilson (BSc Trent; PhD Western; PDF Cambridge): Research in the Wilson group is aimed at understanding the molecular basis of protein function and pathogenic aggregation. To achieve this, we examine how proteins move in solution, how their structure changes as they carry out their physiological functions and how they sometimes undergo erroneous structural shifts that can lead to diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. We use all sorts of tools to support our efforts, but our favorite is a unique brand of Hydrogen/Deuterium exchange (pioneered by us) that is carried out on in-house built, mass spectrometry-coupled microfluidic chips. The Wilson group is funded by NSERC (Discovery, CRD and Engage), the Alzheimer's Society of Canada and CFI.
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K.W. Michael Siu (BSc HKU, MSc Birmingham, PhD Dalhousie, FCIC, FRSC), Distinguished Research Professor of Chemistry: Siu’s research interests span from fundamentals of mass spectrometry and ion chemistry, to next-generation mass spectrometry equipment, and to applications in proteomics and cancer biomarker discovery and verification.  Siu has received many awards and honours, including the F.P. Lossing Award from the Canadian Society for Mass Spectrometry (2005), the Maxxam Award from the Canadian Society for Chemistry (2006), and the Fellowship of the Royal Society of Canada (2009).  Siu has served / serves on the editorial / advisory boards of a number of journals, including Mass Spectrometry Reviews (2003-), Journal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry (2005-2010), Clinical Proteomics (2005-, currently Associate Editor), and Analytica Chimica Acta (2011-).  The Siu group is funded by NSERC (Discovery) and the Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute.
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Diethard Bohme (BSc’62, PhD’65 McGill; PDF University College, NOAA): Research in the Bohme group generally has focused on fundamental physicochemical and applied aspects of chemical reactions of molecules with gaseous ions from plasma-generated atomic ions to large electrosprayed biological ions. A home-built Selected Ion Flow Tube (SIFT) has been the measurement instrument of choice. Topics of interest include kinetics, ion catalysis, metal and biometallic ion chemistry, flame and fullerene ion chemistry, and planetary and interstellar ion chemistry.  Recent research has focused on the use of differential mobility spectroscopy in quantitative peptide and drug analysis. Over the years the research has been funded by NSERC Discovery, MD
S Sciex Partnership), CFI, PRF, California Edison, the AP Sloan, Killam/Canada Council, Av Humbolt Foundations, and the Canada Research Chair program.
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Aaron Wheeler (BSc Furman; PhD Stanford; PDF UCLA): The Wheeler lab is an interdisciplinary research group at the University of Toronto developing lab-on-a-chip techniques for applications in chemistry, biology, and medicine. One of the prime technologies that used in the group is called digital microfluidics (or “DMF”). In DMF, discrete fluidic droplets are manipulated on the surface of an array of electrodes coated with a hydrophobic insulator. The Wheeler group are also heavy users  of mass spectrometry for a wide range of applications, including biomarker quantification in tissue samples, and immuno-pulldown-based analysis of biologic drugs in serum. The Wheeler group is funded by NSERC and CIHR (among many others).
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Andrew Emili is a Professor in the with the Terrence Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research at the University of Toronto.  He received his PhD from the UofT in Molecular Genetics, then pursued post-doctoral studies with the Nobel laureate Dr. Leland Hartwell and the mass spectrometry pioneer John Yates III in Seattle. Since establishing his Toronto laboratory in 2000, Dr. Emili has developed and applied global proteomic, genomic and bioinformatic methods to investigate the molecular associations and functions of the many different proteins expressed in a cell or organism.  His research team has outstanding skills in protein mass spectrometry and related experimental techniques for characterizing protein interaction networks in an unbiased, high-throughput and proteome-wide manner.  His group aims to contribute breakthrough mechanistic insights into how cells and tissues function at the molecular level, and to translate this basic knowledge to enhance the discovery and application of protein biomarkers as novel diagnostic and therapeutic targets.  The Emili lab is well funded by the CIHR, NSERC, ORF, and CFI.
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Rebecca Jockusch (B.A. Carleton College, MN; PhD UC Berkeley; PDF Oxford; CRC): Rebecca’s research program employs techniques from chemistry, biology and physics to better understand the properties of biological molecules, both in isolation and in complexes. Factors affecting protein conformation and dynamics, including the role of water in biological systems, are of particular interest. The unique instrumentation developed for these studies in her laboratory combine trapping mass spectrometers with recent advances in technology for laser spectroscopic experiments. Research highlights include the implementation of sensitive fluorescence detection in order to monitor the conformation of biomolecular ions inside a mass spectrometer via fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) techniques. Her group also employs a wide range of dissociation techniques and ion molecule reactions to characterize the conformation of gaseous ions and to learn how these differ from solution structure. Rebecca is currently a member of the Board of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry (ASMS). The Jockusch group is funded by NSERC, the Province of Ontario and CFI.
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Demian Ifa (BSc University of Rio de Janeiro; PhD University of São Paulo; PDF Purdue): The Ifa group focuses on the development of ambient imaging techniques based mainly on Desorption Ionization mass spectrometry. The technique is suitable for non-destructive imaging of biological samples with applications in pharmacokinetics, environmental analysis and forensics.
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Sergey Krylov (BSc, PhD Moscow State University; CRC): The Krylov group develops new methods in Capillary Electrophoresis for studying the interactions between small molecules and proteins.
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Anne Claude Gingras (BSc Université Laval; PhD McGill; PDF Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle): The Gingras group is a world leader in the development of mass spectrometry-based technologies and bioinformatics tools for proteomics and systems biology research. The main focus of our research program is on phosphorylation networks in disease.
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Scott Mabury (BSc Northland College; PhD UC Davis): The Mabury group is focused on environmental chemistry and the development of new mass-spectrometry based techniques for evaluating trace contaminants in at-risk ecosystems.
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